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Novelties CDs Andean music. Chile
    Land of winds > Music > Novelties | Issue 07 (Sep.-Oct.2011)
    By Edgardo Civallero | Sara Plaza

Chilean Andean music

Generally speaking, on the front of the Andean music scene of Chile (especially the music of northern Chile, which is regarded as “Andean” par excellence) there are bands with a long lasting career. Even though, in recent times (and also due to piracy), most of these groups have chosen to present their works on the stage rather than launching a new album. Three recordings by “classic” exponents of the Chilean Andean music have been listed below.

Illapu - Illapu vivo | Curacas - Seguimos cantando...! | Inti-Illimani histórico - Travesura


Illapu vivo

[1]

Illapu
Illapu vivo
(2008)

1. Bío Bío sueño azul – 2. Tu propia primavera – 3. Vivir es mucho más – 4. Paloma ausente – 5. Primer sueño de amor – 6. Sincero positivo – 7. Ojos de niño – 8. Amigo – 9. Que manera – 10. Escribo por ejemplo – 11. Paloma, vuela de nuevo – 12. Comparsa en negro y blanco – 13. Balajú – 14. Lejos del amor – 15. Un poco de mi vida – 16. Montilla – 17. Baila caporal – 18. Morena esperanza – 19. Vuelvo para vivir – 20. Candombe para José

Since the album “Vivir es mucho más” appeared in 2006, Illapu had not released any other recording. Although “Illapu vivo” does not feature new tracks, this work deserves some praise too. This DVD was assembled from two live shows at the Teatro Oriente and the Teatro Cariola, both in Santiago de Chile, and won the “Disco de Oro” Award (Golden Record) in 2010. It includes some of their best-known songs, from classics such as “Amigo”, “Escribo por ejemplo”, “Paloma, vuela de nuevo”, “Baila caporal”, “Vuelvo para vivir” and “Balajú”, to latest hits like “Vivir es mucho más”, “Que manera”, “Comparsa en negro y blanco” and “Montilla”. It is worth mentioning Elizabeth Huenchual’s collaboration in “Bío Bío sueño azul” (with a passionate prayer in Mapudungu language) and, of course, the outstanding performance of each member of the band, who seem to improve their skill with the years and whose live sound remains so true to their studio sound.


Cover.
Official website [es].


Seguimos cantando...!

[2]

Curacas
Seguimos cantando...!
(2007)

1. El sombrero de Sao – 2. Chagrita caprichosa – 3. Cunumicita – 4. La golondrina – 5. De terciopelo negro – 6. Ilusión – 7. El seclanteño – 8. La desdeñosa – 9. Chañarcillo – 10. Adiós, pueblo de Ayacucho – 11. Orgullosa – 12. Que vivan los estudiantes

Appeared in Santiago de Chile in 1967, Curacas (from Quechua kuraka, “chief of an ayllu”) played an active role in the diffusion of the music from the altiplano in the Nueva Canción Chilena (Chilean New Song). They started as “Los de la Peña” accompanying Ángel Parra’s performances at the famous “Peña de los Parra”.

As time passed the band (renamed themselves Curacas) gained recognition and released three studio albums including traditional songs and several compositions by Violeta Parra: “Norte” (1970), “Curacas” (1971) and “Instrumental andino” (1972). After the military coup of 1973 the band dismantled and came together again to record “Curacas 4” (1975) and “Curacas 5” (1977). In 2007 the band decided to relaunch their career with the release of “Seguimos cantando...!”, featuring old hits (“El sombrero de Sao”) as well as traditional Andean songs (“Chagrita caprichosa”, “Adiós, pueblo de Ayacucho”) and compositions which have become very popular (i.e., the baguala “El seclanteño”). Their sound has not changed much over the years and the band retains its own identity, which will remind those homesick for the 70s’ New Song of the famous recordings that introduced them to the universe of Andean music.


Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link CD [Perrerac.org].


Travesura

[3]

Inti-Illimani (histórico)
Travesura
(2010)

1. Travesura – 2. Drume negrita – 3. Quinteto del tren – 4. Danza negra – 5. La tarara – 6. No me cumbén – 7. Cinco veces – 8. Bicicletas – 9. Líneas para un retrato – 10. Mi papá y mi mamá – 11. Manaures Walzer – 12. Cajita de Olinalá – 13. Introducción musical

Inti-Illimani appeared in 1967 and was one of the most representative groups of the Nueva Canción Chilena (Chilean New Song) as well as one of the most internationally recognized (together with Quilapayún). The band split in two in 2004, with both parts wanting to retain the band’s original name for themselves. The lawsuit remains unsolved and the new formations took the names of “Inti-Illimani histórico” and “Inti-Illimani nuevo” (or “Inti-Illimani (R)”), what has brought endless and regrettable accusations and cross-accusations.

In 2010 Inti-Illimani “histórico” (featuring such figures as Horacio Durán, Horacio Salinas y José Seves) launched “Travesura”, including compositions by Salinas (“Travesura”, “Bicicletas”), Salinas’ arrangements of Aquiles Nazoa’s (“Líneas para un retrato”, “Mi papá y mi mamá”) and Gabriela Mistral’s works (“Cajita de Olinalá”), pieces by Luis Advis (“Quinteto del tren”, “Introducción musical”) and popular songs (“No me cumbén”, from Peru, with the collaboration of Eva Ayllón, and “La tarara”, from Spain, featuring the unmistakable voice of Diego “El Cigala”). The strong presence of string instruments coupled with the fusion of various styles and a very particular way of understanding and expressing Andean rhythms gives the album its distinctive shape and outstanding flavour.


Cover.
Official website [es].
Link CD [Portalnet.cl].


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