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    Land of winds > Music > Reviews | Issue 09 (Mar.-Apr.2012)
    By Edgardo Civallero | Sara Plaza

Bolivian Aymara music

A significant part of present-day Bolivian folklore has its roots in the Aymara musical heritage. Sikureadas, tarkeadas, pinkilladas and mohoseñadas are musical expressions of this people as well as the wistful huaynos from the high plateau (quite different from those played in the Quechua valleys). In addition, Aymara’s sounds have also influenced much "modern" music scenarios such as caporales, sayas, morenadas and diabladas more related to urban Carnival than to rural celebrations.

The following reviews are meant to present the work of several groups engaged in Aymara traditional music including recordings by both little-known rural ensembles (Ayllu Majasaya, Paja Brava, Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta) and those enjoying widespread diffusion and with an interest in collecting and preserving the most authentic expressions of Bolivian folklore.

Paja Brava - Tarkas y zampoñas | Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta - Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta | Andino de Oruro - Música autóctona de Bolivia | Markasata - De nuestro pueblo | Ayllu Majasaya - Música originaria de los Andes de Bolivia


Tarkas y zampoñas

[1]

Paja Brava
Tarkas y zampoñas
(Quilla musical – s/a)

1. Paja brava – 2. El quirquincho – 3. Lindo paisano – 4. La voz de Sajama – 5. Siglo XX – 6. Waca waca – 7. Del Gran Poder – 8. Puerto Acosta – 9. Zanqueñita – 10. Sumac Orko – 11. Socavón ardiente – 12. Pascua – 13. Cóndor jipiña – 14. Mecapaqueña – 15. Zíngaros

"Tarkas y zampoñas" is the only album launched by Paja Brava (which shares the name with another much more prolific Bolivian band appeared in 1977).

The album, as its title indicates, features tropas (groups) of tarkas (wooden flutes, on the first five tracks) and zampoñas (panpipes, on all the rest), performing different rhythms such as huaynos, morenadas and waka-wakas... Although many of the sikureadas do not fulfil the most traditional patterns, the recording offers an introduction to the Aymara music played in the villages located in the high-plateau region of Bolivia.

Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link CD [Intiraymi.ru].



Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta

[2]

Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta
Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta
(Lauro – 1987)

1. Khantu – 2. Imillita – 3. Muni ali – 4. Ponchito rojo – 5. Quena quena – 6. Miskhamayu – 7. Cacharpaya del Mocomoco – 8. Carnaval de Aquiri – 9. Recuerdo de Ayopata – 10. Choclito verde

This group was formed by about ten musicians and only launched this album, which includes pieces from the Aymara region of Bolivia. By blowing tropas (groups) of zampoñas (panpipes), tarkas (wooden flutes) and quena-quenas (notch flutes) in the traditional manner, Centro de Música Nativa Khonsatta played in different rhythms and styles from the k'antu ("Khantu") to the sikuriada ("Imillita", "Ponchito rojo", "Miskhamayu", "Recuerdo de Ayopata"), the tarkeada ("Muni ali", "Carnaval de Aquiri", "Choclito verde"), the quena-quena and the sikuri de Italaque ("Cacharpaya de Mocomoco").

With the exception of "Imillita", all the others are popular songs collected from the communities in which they were born and recorded according to Aymara traditional patterns.

Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link CD [Mi-musica-andina.blogspot.com].



Música autóctona de Bolivia

[3]

Andino de Oruro
Música autóctona de Bolivia
(s/d - 1995)

1. Mariposa orureñita – 2. El cóndor pasa – 3. Jula julas – Tata Laguna – Déjame – 4. Las palabras – 5. Diablada tradicional – 6. Auki auki – 7. Sariri – 8. La pesada – 9. Tesorito – 10. Cómo has hecho – 11. Lamento de mi tarka – 12. Danza de los Incas

Grupo Andino de Oruro appeared in the town of the same name in 1981 featuring six students. They came first at the X Festival Nacional de la Canción Boliviana and shortly after launched their first album ("Grupo Andino de Oruro", 1983), which includes famous caporal "Cómo has hecho". Since then the group has been touring nationally and internationally and has won several awards. They compose and perform music from all over the country, especially from the high-plateau region, and their albums feature an array of rhythms and styles.

After their debut album they have released "Pachamama" (1985), "Sé feliz" and "Lo mejor de Andino" (1986), "Tierra y vida" (1987), "Pequeño Juanito" (1989), "Soledad sin rumbo" (1990), "Rosas thikas" (1994), "Música autóctona de Bolivia" and "Estrella azul" (1995), "De regreso a mi tierra" (1997), "Tradiciones orureñas" (1998), "Bolivia, corazón de Sudamérica" (2000), "Uru supaya" (2004) and "Sikuris" (2010).

"Música autóctona de Bolivia" is instrumental and features Aymara rhythms and styles such as tarkeadas ("Mariposa orureñita"), jula julas ("Jula julas") and suri sikuris ("Las palabras"). In addtion, the album includes huaynos ("Tesorito", "Lamento de mi tarka"), caporales ("Cómo has hecho"), morenadas ("La pesada") and diabladas ("Diablada tradicional"). Each member of Andino de Oruro takes a great deal of care over his work resulting in a clear sound that honours the tradition they try to perpetuate.

Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link complete discography [Incamusic.narod.ru].



De nuestro pueblo

[4]

Markasata
De nuestro pueblo
(Discolandia - 1998)

1. Ch'uta – 2. Ausencia – 3. Selección de sicureadas (Flor de cactus - Caramba chiquita - Un corazón como el mío) – 4. Agüita de Putina – 5. Selección de tarqueadas (Linda santiagueña - A qué volviste - Cebadilla) – 6. Sicuri de Italaque – 7. Forastero – 8. Llaullina – 9. Selección de sicureadas (Saririway – Desde la rotonda – Adiós mi pueblo de Huaycho) – 10. Marcha – 11. Kamata – 12. Tiscu-tiscu

Markasata (in Aymara, "(belonging) to our people") appeared in Bolivia in the 70s under the name of "Cactus". Due to political reasons, their members fled the country during Hugo Banzer’s dictatorship and moved to Argentina. Years later they went back to Bolivia, where they settled in the community Wairicondo (department of La Paz) and changed the name to Markasata or Comunidad Markasata.

Their first album, "De nuestro pueblo", was released in 1998 and was followed by "Mi tierra – Homenaje 20 años" (2005). The group comprises about twenty musicians who started playing Aymara traditional rhythms and styles and later went on to explore criollo music.

"De nuestro pueblo" (also known as "Sicureada") includes tarkeadas ("Selección de tarqueadas") and several tracks played on zampoñas (panpipes): sikureadas ("Selección de sicureadas"), sikuris de Italaque ("Ausencia"), k'antus ("Forastero", "Marcha", "Kamata"), huaynos ("Llaullina") and pasacalles ("Tiscu-tiscu"). The album’s sound is notable for the great and inimitable quality of the performances featured on it.

Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link CD [Om-inti.blogspot.com].



Música originaria de los Andes de Bolivia

[5]

Ayllu Majasaya
Música originaria de los Andes de Bolivia
(PRODEVAT - 2003)

1. Majasayeñita – 2. Chimpaykumuyku – 3. Mariposita – 4. Leqe leqe – 5. Llijllita – 6. Chayamuyku – 7. Ayllu Chullpani – 8. Cuanto cuestas, cuanto vales – 9. Recuerdos del año nuevo – 10. Desde Mujlli Waylla – 11. Paulina – 12. Cholita Alicia – 13. Wari warita – 14. Nuestro PRODEVAT – 15. Cultura andina – 16. Ñaupa tiempos – 17. Llajta kantus – 18. Estudiantes somos

This work was funded by the PRODEVAT, the provincial government of Tapacarí, AGRUCO and Kurmi Cochabamba; the album features performances by musical groups from the Aymara communities of Japo K'asa, Mujlli Waylla, Uyuni, Lakulakuni, Jach'apampa and Ch'ullpani, all of them part of the ayllu Majasaya Mujlli (province of Tapacarí, department of Cochabamba).

Rhythms like the huayno and the tonada are played in the traditional manner and listeners will be rewarded with sounds echoing an ancient culture. Those sounds are the outcome of the air singing through the sikus ("Masajayeñita", "Ñaupa tiempos", "Cultura andina"), jula julas ("Ayllu Chullpani"), tarkas ("Recuerdos del año nuevo", "Estudiantes somos"), mohoseños ("Chimpaykumuyku", "Desde Mujlli Waylla"), lichiguayos ("Leqe leqe", "Wari warita") and dancing with the strings of the khonkhotas ("Mariposita", "Llijllita").

The songs played on the charangos khonkhotas (q'onq'otas) are one of the most remarkable tracks to ever be put on record.
"Música originaria de los Andes de Bolivia" is an outstanding work or art and music. A significant part of the Bolivian regional musical heritage can be found on this album, which will delight enthusiasts and neophytes alike. None of them will be disappointed after listening to one the most authentic Aymara music compilations.

Cover.
Official website: Not available.
Link CD [Inca.ucoz.ru].



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